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Article
January 7, 1905

BLINDNESS AND OCULOMOTOR PALSIES FROM INJURIES NOT INVOLVING THE OPTIC OR OCULOMOTOR NERVES.

Author Affiliations

BUFFALO, N. Y.

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(1):4-8. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.92500280001002
Abstract

That the eye in its visual function and motility is disturbed by causes remote from it, has been known for centuries, and is also a matter of common observation to-day. Among these disturbing causes have been found certain injuries about the face and forehead, which have led to partial or complete loss of vision, usually of one eye, and paralysis, partial or complete, of some of the ocular nerves, these injuries not seeming to involve the particular nerves whose function was impaired or lost. In a large proportion of these cases the injuries have apparently been limited to the fifth nerve, or some of its branches. Hippocrates had noticed this, and it is recorded that he said "the sight is obscured in wounds which are inflicted on the eyebrow or a little higher."1

Blindness and ocular palsies following violent injuries of the face and head, and direct injuries of the optic and

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