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Article
August 30, 1890

PSYCHICAL RESULTS OF GYNECOLOGICAL OPERATIONS.Read in the Section of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women at the Forty-first Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association, at Nashville, Tenn., May, 1890.

Author Affiliations

OF LINCOLN, VA. MEMBER VIRGINIA STATE BOARD OF MEDICAL EXAMINERS, SOUTHERN SURGICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION, FELLOW OF THE BRITISH GYNECOLOGICAL SOCIETY, ETC.

JAMA. 1890;XV(9):305-307. doi:10.1001/jama.1890.02410350001001

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Abstract

It has become quite the fashion of late, on the part of anti-surgical gynecologists and others opposed to radical measures in the treatment of the diseases of women, to make suggestive allusion to the possibility of insanity, or other grave neurosis, following operations. This paper is accordingly presented to this Section, showing, as I believe it does, the real facts as known to-day upon the question: "Do psychoses follow gynecological operations?"

The advent of Apostoli's application of electricity, has also afforded an opportune moment for the anti-surgical practitioner to renew and reinforce himself against radical treatment. The brilliant claims of Apostoli, and the still more arrogant assumption of certain followers of the gifted electrician, would lead the casual reader and observer to the supposition that hysterectomy for myoma is no longer a necessity. It is, therefore, not surprising that between the two extremes, there should be an active

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