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Article
January 21, 1905

CYSTS OF BARTHOLIN'S GLANDSWITH BRIEF REMARKS ON THE ANATOMY OF THE NORMAL GLAND STRUCTURE.

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE, MD.

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(3):204-210. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.92500300036001j
Abstract

Bartholin's gland was named after Bartholinus, who described it in detail in the seventeenth century. In 1761 Duverney1 gave in detail the results of further studies of the gland, and pointed out the resemblance between its tissue and that of the prostate gland; he also mentioned the duct of the gland and demonstrated its opening at the vulva. Huguier2 (1850) published a most extensive and thorough article on diseases of this gland and referred to it as the vulvovaginal gland.

In 1892 Müller gave a résumé of the literature of the development of Bartholin's glands. He says that they are first recognized in the fetus when it has attained a length of 4.5 cm. Here they are seen as solid cords passing off from the sinus urogenitalis.

Pohlman, who has been giving this subject much study in Professor Mall's laboratory, tells me that the beginning of

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