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Article
September 20, 1890

SOME NOTES ON THE NAILS.Read in the Section of Dermatology and Syphiligrophy, at the Forty-first Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association, at Nashville, Tenn., May, 1890.

Author Affiliations

OF PHILADELPHIA, PA.

JAMA. 1890;XV(12):427-428. doi:10.1001/jama.1890.02410380015001d

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Abstract

In the early days of the world, before man had learned to utilize the stores of nature, the nails were of far more importance than at present. As the first weapon of attack and defense, the first implement of digging in the soil, or cutting or preparing the food, a healthy finger nail was one of the necessities for a healthy existence.

Even at the present time, they are of the utmost importance as an ornamental and useful appendage of the skin.

They preserve the delicate and sensitive nerves of the posterior terminal portion of the fingers from contact with irritative substances. They protect the sense of touch in the tips of the fingers from becoming dull by constant contact and perform a thousand other useful offices. It will thus be seen that attention to their health is of paramount importance. Fortunately for both physician and patient, diseases of the

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