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Article
January 29, 1898

AN IMPROVED METHOD OF DETECTING CASTS IN THE URINE.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY IN RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE.; FORMERLY FELLOW IN CHEMISTRY IN RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE, CHICAGO, ILL.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(5):234-236. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440570002001a

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Abstract

As is well known, two methods are in use for obtaining the sediment from urine for the purpose of microscopic examination. The oldest and most frequently used is by natural subsidence. A quantity of the urine is placed in a cylindric or conical vessel and allowed to stand at rest for twelve or twenty-four hours, or even longer, when the sediment thrown down is removed by a pipette and a drop or more of it examined under the microscope. The other method is by the use of the centrifuge; the urine being placed in suitable tubes and subjected to rapid revolution the sediment is quickly thrown to the outer ends of the tubes, from which it may readily be removed by a pipette and placed under the microscope for examination.

Each of these methods has its advantages and each its disadvantages. The method by subsidence has the advantage of permitting

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