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Article
February 25, 1905

A CASE OF LOCOMOTOR ATAXIA WITH A TREMOR RESEMBLING THAT OF PARALYSIS AGITANS.

Author Affiliations

Neurologist of the St. Agnes Hospital. PHILADELPHIA.;(From the William Pepper Laboratory of Clinical Medicine and the Philadelphia Home for Incurables.)

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(8):608-609. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.92500350018001d
Abstract

At a session of the American Medical Association in June, 1902, I reported three cases of involuntary movements in ataxia. Since that time one of these patients has died, and I was fortunate enough to obtain an autopsy. The case was one in which a tremor of both arms existed from the early stages of the disease. This tremor was like that of paralysis agitans.

Patient.  —A man, aged 57; family history good. He himself had always been healthy, having never had any serious illness of any sort, and has always been temperate in alcohol and tobacco.

History.  —In 1883 he contracted syphilis. The first tabetic symptoms consisted of the characteristic pains of ataxia, from which he suffered for nine years before the other symptoms of the disease made their appearance. Then there gradually developed numbness of the hands, unsteadiness in walking, and the tremor in both hands

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