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Article
March 11, 1905

THE USE OF FOOD PRESERVATIVES.

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(10):753-756. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.92500370001001
Abstract

Inasmuch as the succession of seasons, the intervals between harvests and great distances from sources of supply compel man to store and transport many food products, and since these are more or less perishable, the desirability and the necessity of artificially preserving these foods from decay and from putrefaction are apparent; and certain agents have been used for this purpose from prehistoric times. Common salt, or sodium chlorid, has priority in point of time, and potassium nitrate, or saltpeter, has the sanction of long-continued use, although I am not sure that the unrestricted use of the latter is altogether free from harm. Primitive man, in all probability, learned from observation that meat exposed to the smoke of his campfire did not become putrid so quickly as meat not so treated. Sterilization and canning are of comparatively recent introduction, but now of wide application. Refrigeration finds frequent new adaptations and the

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