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Article
February 12, 1898

THE ACTION OF ODORS, PLEASANT AND UNPLEASANT, UPON BLOOD FLOW.

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK, N. Y.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(7):366. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440590026001i

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Abstract

In 1859, Alvan Clarke made me a laryngoscope. After 1862 I studied auto-laryngoscopy and auto-rhinoscopy. I took the first photographs in this continent of the living larynx in 1866; copies of these are deposited in the United States Army Medical Museum, Washington.

I was and am able to demonstrate to myself, my posterior nares, either Eustachian orifice, turbinated bones, dome of pharynx, vomer, etc.

Among the physiologic studies made in 1866 was the action of cologne, roses, camphor, ammonia, sulphur fumes, etc., upon the erectile tissues of the turbinated bones. They were of a pale ashy white color ordinarily. A few whiffs through the nose of any of these odors increased the blood flow and produced immediately a livid injection and turgescence of the erectile tissues on the turbinated bones, that stood out as clearly and positively as the erection and turgescence of the livid wattles of an excited turkey

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