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Article
February 14, 1891

COFFEE, ITS USE AND ABUSE.Read at the Louisville Meeting of the Mississippi Valley Medical Association, October 13, 1890.

Author Affiliations

OF ST. LOUIS. PRESIDENT AMERICAN MEDICAL EDITORS' ASSOCIATION (1890); PRESIDENT PEDIATRIC SECTION OF AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION (1890); PRESIDENT MISSISSIPPI VALLEY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION (1887); SECRETARY PEDIATRIC SECTION, NINTH INTERNATIONAL MEDICAL CONGRESS; PROFESSOR DISEASES OF CHILDREN, CLINICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE, MARION SIMS COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, ST. LOUIS; CONSULTING PHYSICIAN, CITY HOSPITAL, ST. LOUIS; EDITOR MEDICAL MIRROR, ST. LOUIS.

JAMA. 1891;XVI(7):219-221. doi:10.1001/jama.1891.02410590003001a

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Abstract

I shall not attempt to present a history of the coffee plant, but rather give a few of the virtues it possesses, and draw attention to the fact that the commonplace is often overlooked in our desire to discover that which is new, striking and sensational. I recall a remark that I heard made a year or two ago by a very worthy but somewhat censorious member of our profession, to the effect that he did not propose to attempt to address the profession unless he had something absolutely original to offer. In this connection, I venture this thought: that which is good and true will bear repetition, and it is rarely original.

In Southern Abyssinia the coffee plant grows wild in profusion, and has been in use from very ancient times. The name is probably taken from Koffa, the name of a district south of Abyssinia. The coffee-producing belt

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