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Article
March 25, 1905

CLINICAL EXAMINATION OF THE URINE.A CRITICAL STUDY OF THE COMMONER METHODS.

JAMA. 1905;XLIV(12):943-950. doi:10.1001/jama.1905.92500390027001f
Abstract

ACUTE DEGENERATION.  In the 93 cases of this condition which I have studied, the diagnosis was correctly made in all but three. What I desire to point out here is:1. That the urine may vary very greatly in composition in different cases, despite identical postmortem findings.2. That in a few cases the diagnosis of something more serious than fever urine might have been made by any one accustomed to take his urinary analysis very seriously.I will take up this latter point first. Among the cases in which only acute degeneration was discovered postmortem, there were two called acute nephritis before death, and one called chronic nephritis. Besides these there was a case of puerperal eclampsia in which a nephritis of some type was assumed to be present, and in a case in which the patient died in convulsions suspected to be of uremie origin. It is a significant

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