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Article
March 21, 1891

ECTOPIC PREGNANCY; WITH PRESENTATION OF SPECIMEN.Read before the St. Louis Medical Society, January 24, 1891,

Author Affiliations

OF ST. LOUIS, MO. PROFESSOR OF GYNECOLOGY, MARION-SIMS COLLEGE OF MEDICINE; ATTENDING GYNECOLOGIST TO THE GRAND AVENUE FREE DISPENSARY; CONSULTING GYNECOLOGIST TO THE ST. LOUIS FEMALE HOSPITAL AND ST LOUIS CITY HOSPITAL.

JAMA. 1891;XVI(12):397-401. doi:10.1001/jama.1891.02410640001001

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Abstract

I do not wish to report a case of mere ectopie pregnancy, since I did not see the patient from whom this specimen was obtained. She bled to death and presented the usual symptoms incident to a lesion of this character; the diagnosis was not made.

On post-mortem the abdominal cavity was found filled with clotted blood, which had proceeded from a rupture of the right Fallopian tube.

With great confidence, I pronounce this a case of ruptured tubai pregnancy; for whilst no foetus was found (none being sought for), the gross appearance of the parts justifies the exclusion of all other lesions to which the tubes are liable. Nothing is found to sustain the belief that the inflammatory disturbances to which the tubes are liable, or the neoplasms which, in rare instances, attack them, produced the pathological appearances present. Extravasation of blood into the tubes, with subsequent rupture into

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