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Article
August 2, 1902

CRYPTORCHIDISM, WITH A REPORT OF TWO CASES OF NATURAL EUNUCHS.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF SKIN AND VENEREAL DISEASES, CHICAGO POLICLINIC. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1902;XXXIX(5):233-236. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.52480310001001
Abstract

The congenital absence of the testicle from the scrotum, or cryptorchidism, as this condition is called, is a subject rich in literature, for it has attracted the attention of physicians for three hundred years.

CASES IN HISTORY.  The early writings require no special consideration, inasmuch as they have been thoroughly reviewed by Godard,1 whose thesis on this subject, published at Paris in 1858, serves as the basis of all future studies of this question. A copy of this thesis constitutes one of the many priceless treasures of Dr. Nicholas Senn's collection in the Newberry Library.Godard states that the first case of which there is any record of an absence of both testicles was reported by Cabrol, in 1564. The individual was a soldier, who was executed for an attempt at rape. On postmortem examination the epididymes were found present, but there was no trace of either testicle. Cabrol

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