[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.163.158.163. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 25, 1891

SPONTANEOUS UMBILICAL HÆMORRHAGE IN NEWLY-BORN INFANTS.Read before the Medical Society of the District of Columbia, February 4, 1891.

Author Affiliations

VISITING PHYSICIAN TO WASHINGTON ASYLUM HOSPITAL; ATTENDING PHYSICIAN TO ST. ANN'S INFANT ASYLUM; AND OBSTETRICIAN TO COLUMBIA HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND LYING-IN ASYLUM.

JAMA. 1891;XVI(17):577-581. doi:10.1001/jama.1891.02410690001001
Abstract

(Concluded from page 547.)

Diagnosis.—The diagnosis of this condition is usually not difficult. The appearance of blood on the dressings about the navel usually leads to examination of it and of the cord if still attached. The bleeding will be noticed in nearly every case. When it occurs from the end of the cord it may be mistaken for bleeding due to defective ligation. It may occur at various intervals and in small quantities, thus escaping detection. Especially will this be the case if the blood be very hydræmic or if containing much bile. If the bleeding of this nature be from the end of the cord successive ligation will probably prove futile and the true nature of the malady will be recognized. There will be evidences of a constitutional affection, denoted by purpuric spots, hæmorrhage from other parts of the body, jaundice and other unmistakable symptoms.

Treatment.—The treatment of

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×