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Article
May 2, 1891

THE EFFECT OF ARTERIO-SCLEROSIS UPON THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Read before the Clinical Society of Maryland, January 16, 1891.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF PHYSIOLOGY AND DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM, COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS, BALTIMORE.

JAMA. 1891;XVI(18):618-622. doi:10.1001/jama.1891.02410700006002

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Abstract

In order to appreciate fully the significance of disease of the blood vessels of the central nervous system, it is necessary to keep in mind the general plan of the blood supply of the brain and cord. If we disregard a few meningeal branches from other arteries, the brain is supplied by four trunks: the two internal carotids and the two vertebrals. It is not necessary to mention the well known arrangement of these arteries at the base of the brain into the circle of Willis. The blood-vessels that supply the brain are peculiar for their long and tortuous course through bony canals, and the fact that they are unaccompanied by veins. After having formed the circle of Willis they send branches to supply the different regions of the cortex, and other branches which penetrate the substance of the brain and supply internal parts. These latter branches while they are

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