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Article
September 6, 1902

MENTAL THERAPEUTICS AND THE NEED OF PSYCHOLOGY IN THE MEDICAL CURRICULUM.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Nervous and Mental Diseases in the University of Denver. DENVER, COLO.

JAMA. 1902;XXXIX(10):551-553. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.52480360031001g
Abstract

Every illness is a factor simple or complex, which is multiplied by a second factor, invariably complex—the individual who is suffering from it. The doctor who does not read you to the bottom is ignorant of essentials. To me the ideal doctor would be a man endowed with profound knowledge of life and of the soul, intuitively divining any suffering of whatever kind, and restoring peace by his mere presence. Such a doctor is possible.—Amiel's Journal.

Physicians need no argument to show that purely physical processes may cause profound mental changes. Every case of lesion of the brain, every delirious fever patient, every exhilarated banqueter, furnishes a fresh illustration of the fact. The converse proposition, that purely mental processes may cause profound physical changes, still excites a tendency to doubt or wonder, but it is just as true and special instances are just as familiar. The blanched face, chattering

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