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Article
March 12, 1898

CERTAIN CONDITIONS OF THE TONSILS WHICH LIMIT THE USEFULNESS OF THE TONSILLOTOME.

Author Affiliations

Laryngologist and Aurist to the German Hospital, Philadelphia, and to the Pennsylvania Institution for the Deaf and Dumb. Fellow of the American Laryngological Association, and of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. PHILADELPHIA, PA.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(11):591-593. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440630017001g

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Abstract

It seems a safe assertion to say that the tonsillotome is the instrument most frequently selected by the surgeon in the performance of tonsillotomy. In most instances, however, I think that excision would be more effectually done by other means than by the guillotine-knife.

This opinion may appear easier of acceptance or denial, if we think for a moment why we should excise a tonsil at all. The operation is done either for the removal of a mass from the fauces which occludes the respiratory tract and interferes with phonation, or for the purpose of freeing the throat from the presence of tissue already so abnormal that it readily becomes infected by any micro-organisms which produce an inflammatory process. In either event, unless the work of excision is done thoroughly, the end sought is not attained, and the instrument depended upon has failed in its work. Why should the tonsillotome

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