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Article
March 19, 1898

ACUTE MYRINGITIS.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OP OTOLOGY IN THE PHILADELPHIA POLYCLINIC. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(12):651-653. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440640019003d

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Abstract

The subject of acute myringitis is usually disposed of in a page or two in most text-books, and one of the most popular modern treatises does not even mention it, yet its widely dissimilar course in different patients, its tendency to produce serious lesions, and its painful character render the disease worthy of most careful study. Acute myringitis differs much in type, each having its own pathology, symptomatology and treatment; it is therefore convenient to divide it into simple, desquamative, hemorrhagic and suppurative varieties.

Simple inflammation of the drum membrane is caused by disease of the external auditory canal, of the Eustachian tube and middle ear, or by direct injury from foreign bodies, irritating fluids, cold water, etc. It is one of the commonest of aural maladies, the ordinary cases of slight earache being usually examples of this disease. The symptoms are usually pain, slight deafness and throbbing tinnitus. Pathologically

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