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Article
September 5, 1891

FUGITIVE BLOOD CORPUSCLES IN A CASE OF LYMPHADENOMA.

Author Affiliations

OF SAN FRANCISCO.

JAMA. 1891;XVII(10):373-374. doi:10.1001/jama.1891.02410880021001c

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Abstract

Microscopic examination of a drop of blood from the finger of a patient with lymphadenorua of long standing, revealed several interesting phenomena. The examination was made with a B. and L homogeneous immersion objective, N. A. 1.43, and Zeiss' compensating eye-pieces, giving a magnifying power of 800 to 2,400 diameters. Lower powers are of little use in examining blood corpuscles. The drop of blood was placed upon a thin cover-glass, which was quickly dropped upon a slide and gentle pressure made upon it, so as to obtain a thin layer.

A little more than a year ago, in an essay read before the California State Medical Society, and published in its Transactions, I reported my observation upon the structure of normal blood corpuscles, as seen in a solution of bichromate of potass. These observations showed a great difference in size, shape and activity among the corpuscles, corresponding, in all probability,

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