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Article
September 12, 1891

THE CONSTRUCTION OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS.

JAMA. 1891;XVII(11):415-416. doi:10.1001/jama.1891.02410890033005

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Abstract

Read in the Section on State Medicine at the Forty-second Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association, held at Washington, D. C, May, 1891.

BY D. F. LINCOLN, M.D.,

OF GENEVA, N. Y. CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL HYGIENE OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION.

In dealing with this question, we are obliged to make allowance for difference in circumstances. We demand space, fresh air, light; and these needful things undeniably cost money. The poorer and less enlightened communities will grudge payment, even for such necessaries of life; but the number must be very small, of those who have not a disposition to improve, and a willingness "to make some sacrifice. The burden does not always fall heaviest upon the poor districts; land costs next to nothing in the country, and the struggle for elbow-room between tall overshadowing buildings is unknown, while in rich cities it may happen

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