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Article
October 10, 1891

THE TREATMENT OF HYPERTROPHIED TONSILS.Read by title before the Section of Laryngology and Otology, at the Forty-second Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association, Washington, D. C., May 1, 1891.

Author Affiliations

OF NEW YORK. PROFESSOR OF LARYNGOLOGY AND RHINOLOGY, NEW YORK POSTGRADUATE MEDICAL SCHOOL; SURGEON MANHATTAN EYE AND EAR HOSPITAL.

JAMA. 1891;XVII(15):537-540. doi:10.1001/jama.1891.02410930001001
Abstract

An enlarged tonsil may project beyond the pillars of the fauces without giving rise to any special subjective symptoms, or it may provoke serious disturbance and yet be invisible except during the act of retching. It may interfere with hearing, impede breathing, or obstruct swallowing, or it may simply be the cause of pharyngeal irritability or of various reflex disorders. The amount of functional derangement excited by an enlarged tonsil depends in part upon the relative dimensions of the faucial space and upon the temperament of the individual. Moderate hypertrophy in a contracted pharynx or in a neurotic subject may be the source of excessive annoyance, whereas an extreme degree of enlargement may be easily tolerated in a capacious pharynx or by a phlegmatic subject.

At the present day but few will be found to object to the statement that hypertrophied tonsils require to be reduced or removed, even in

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