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July 21, 1900

SARCOMA OF THE STOMACH.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Medicine in the University of Michigan. ANN ARBOR, MICH.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(3):156-159. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24620290026002g
Abstract

T. J. W., a male, married, merchant, 55 years old, was admitted to the University Hospital Jan. 18, 1900, on account of loss of strength and weight, and distention, burning pain and tumor in the region of the stomach.

The family history is negative. In early life, he had whooping-cough and measles, and while in the army during the Civil War, he had several attacks of intermittent fever, and was jaundiced four months. Ever since then he has been constipated. Up to two years ago he had every summer an attack of pain in the abdomen, with vomiting, fever, pain in the head and back, ending with diarrhea, but he has never had jaundice after these attacks.

During the last four years, he was postmaster and had long hours. He ate hurriedly and heartily, almost without mastication; and thinks that this has aggravated his present disease. He uses tea and

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