[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 28, 1900

POST-FEBRILE INSANITY AND ITS TREATMENT.

Author Affiliations

JACKSONVILLE, ILL.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(4):204-207. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24620300006002
Abstract

All disorders that affect general nutrition of the body may affect the mind. The brain, the organ of the mind, is sensitive to nutritional changes, and when these are profound they may permanently affect the mind's nature. The imperceptible fluctuations of brain nutrition have concomitant fluctuations of mental action, and these physical processes, if carefully studied, reveal to us that there is physical basis to mind. The physiology of mind need not be discussed here nor need we wander into the psychologic labyrinths to study the relationship of body to mind. It is only necessary to state, whatever is the organic process of mental action, its basis is, like that of other elements, in the cell. The brain-cell has its organization and its nutrition; perversion of either causes disturbance of function. This disturbance when changing the routine and characteristics of an individual mental life, we sometimes call insanity. But do

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×