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August 4, 1900

SOME INCIDENTS IN THE EVOLUTION OF THE MODERN PHYSICIAN.

Author Affiliations

IPSWICH, ENGLAND.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(5):290-293. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24620310024001g
Abstract

The president commenced his address with notice of the associations of Ipswich and the deaths of Drs. Stewart and Paget, then passed to the subject of development of British medicine, which was the theme of his address. The early history of medicine in England is that of the Dark Ages; and down to the commencement of the sixteenth century, England had taken no part in the scientific advance of the century, and for almost one hundred years later no discovery of any importance was due to English research. The commencement of British medicine he dates from the return of Thomas Linacre to Oxford from the Italian universities, whence he came imbued with what was termed "new learning."

The great event in the sixteenth century, so far as medicine was concerned, was the success of Linacre in persuading the king to grant a charter to a small body of medical graduates,

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