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Article
November 21, 1891

HOW MUCH OUGHT A SMALL CITY TO PAY ITS HEALTH OFFICER?

Author Affiliations

SECRETARY OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH, LANSING, MICHIGAN.

JAMA. 1891;XVII(21):803-805. doi:10.1001/jama.1891.02410990021001f
Abstract

[From advance sheets of "Proceedings of a Sanitary Convention held at Negaunee, Michigan," August, 1891.]

I presume that the reason why each city is required by law to have a health officer, is that sentiments of common humanity dictate that proper effort shall be made, constantly, by the officers of every locality, for the best possible protection of human life and health within their jurisdiction.

But in this paper I propose to go a step further, and to point out the fact that this high humanitarian position which the law contemplates, when it requires cities to guard the health of their inhabitants, and to contribute facts and statistics for the general welfare of the people of the State, that all this from a financial stand-point, pays the people of each city and of each locality. I propose to speak especially of the city of Negaunee, but the same principle which

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