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November 28, 1891

THE AMBULANCE SERVICE OF GENERAL HOSPITALS IN CITIES: "THE LITTLE WARD ON WHEELS."

JAMA. 1891;XVII(22):858-859. doi:10.1001/jama.1891.02411000036004

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Abstract

One of the modern improvements of hospitals is the ambulance—inclusive of the bright young surgeon. If we mistake not, twenty years ago there were not in the country more hospital wagons than could be counted on the fingers of one hand, while now there are in some cities eight or ten thoroughly equipped vehicles. The last report of the superintendent of the Johns Hopkins Hospital alludes to the want, felt at that institution and in the city of Baltimore, of some adequate means of transit for its patients. Dr. Hurd writes as follows: "An ambulance is desirable and would serve a most useful purpose. There is at present no ambulance system in Baltimore and accident cases and cases of severe disease are forced to rely upon the police patrol wagon, which does not furnish any adequate shelter from the sun or storm, or good facilities for the transportation of the

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