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Article
September 1, 1900

FRACTURE OF THE SUPERIOR MAXILLA IN A MAN 70 YEARS OLD, WITH RECOVERY.

Author Affiliations

ROGERS PARK, ILL.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(9):553-555. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24620350023001h
Abstract

The subject of fractures of the superior maxilla must always be of interest to some of the profession. As a general rule, perhaps the injury comes first to the general surgeon, who may or may not call in a skilled dentist to assist him. In many instances, I am afraid a general practitioner is not as well informed in the treatment as he should be from a dental standpoint, and it is not to be wondered at when we consult our text-books or journals of surgery on the subject—the information being exceedingly meager and ancient. It may again be asked: Is the dental surgeon, unless doubly qualified,1 capable of taking entire charge of such cases, especially as the injury is usually severe and may have complications, as shock, hemorrhage, meningitis and septicemia? The position of a dentist has recently been decided in at least one of the states by

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