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January 30, 1892

CONTAMINATION OF RIVER WATER COURSES. AN EPIDEMIC OF TYPHOID FEVER.

JAMA. 1892;XVIII(5):140-141. doi:10.1001/jama.1892.02411090020004

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Abstract

The excessive prevalence of fever at Lowell, and other points on the Merrimac River, has led the municipal authorities of that city to institute an investigation into the water supply, and other suspected fever causes, which has brought out some most interesting and significant revelations. The report on this subject, as made by Professor W. T. Sedgwick, biologist to the State Board of Health of Massachusetts, appears to be an exceptionally clear and forcible document. It was published in two of the April numbers of the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal. After considering the relations of the excessive typhoid rate and mortality with the milk supply, and excluding that as a probable source of danger, the author fixes his attention upon the drinking-water of the city, which has for many years been chiefly drawn from the Merrimac River. The writer shows by tables that the two cities of Lowell and

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