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Article
January 30, 1892

THE HEALTH OF VETERANS, OR TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AFTER THE WAR.

JAMA. 1892;XVIII(5):141. doi:10.1001/jama.1892.02411090021005

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Abstract

Dr. John L. Billings, of the army, has contributed to The Forum, for January, a brief study of the health of the survivors of the war, as judged by data compiled under the eleventh census. The author's intention is to show with regard to the troops of a single State, Massachusetts, what may at some future time, be worked up for the Northern States as a whole. In that State about 40,000 veterans were reported as living on the first of June, 1890. These form about one-eighth part of the white male population over forty years old. Hence, if they were all equally healthy, the number of sickness cases reported by the census should be seven times as great among the latter as among the former. But the census indicates that there is four times as much sickness among veterans as among other males of the same age. Among the

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