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Article
February 6, 1892

INTRACRANIAL CLOT FROM INJURY WITHOUT FRACTURE OF THE SKULL.

Author Affiliations

OF MUSCATINE, IOWA.

JAMA. 1892;XVIII(6):164-165. doi:10.1001/jama.1892.02411100012001c

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Abstract

Case 1.—May 9, 1891, Dr. C. W. Battey requested me to see L. G., aged 5 years, in consultation with him. Four days previously she had fallen fifteen and a half feet, striking her head on a plank sidewalk. She was picked up unconscious, but remained so only for a few moments. Physicians who examined her immediately found no fracture, depressed bone, or other evidence of serious injury.

Since the fall she had had no opiate or sedative of any kind, yet had no pain, ate well, bowels open, and slept eighteen hours in twenty-four; answered questions correctly, but hesitatingly; protruded and retracted the tongue like a typhoid patient. Sensation and muscular coördination was perfect. Temperature 99½° F., pulse 72. There was great discoloration of all the palpebrai and ocular tissues, with sufficient œdema to completely close the right eye and prevent inspection of the right pupil. Left pupil responded

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