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Article
October 20, 1900

SOME THOUGHTS ON OVERCROWDING AND TUBERCULOSIS.

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK CITY.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(16):991-992. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24620420005001b
Abstract

I have been requested by the Secretary of the Committee on Tuberculosis, appointed by the President of The American Medical Association, to write a few words on the etiology of tuberculosis, more particularly on the relation which overcrowding bears to the frequency of consumption. To offer something new in this line is really difficult, for the subject has been treated so many times by abler minds than my own.

In some of my previous publications1 I have spoken of numerous visits made to the tenements of New York, of the heartrending conditions I have found there among consumptives, and of the sweatshops as agents in the propagation of disease, but, after all, I presume it can not be repeated too often that the tuberculosis problem, especially in our large cities, will never be solved unless we begin by improving the sanitary condition of the tenements. There should be laws

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