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Article
October 20, 1900

TUBERCULOSIS IN PENNSYLVANIA.

Author Affiliations

President of the Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Tuberculosis; Secretary of the American Climatological Association: Fellow of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, etc. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(16):996-999. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24620420010001e
Abstract

Pennsylvanians are beginning to take more interest in the subject of tuberculosis. In a state in which about eight thousand persons, nearly all of them in the prime of life, die of this disease each year, it ought to receive much more attention from those who have it in their power to reduce this unnecessary sacrifice of life. The first and last systematic study of consumption in Pennsylvania was made by the late Dr. William Pepper and the writer in 1886 for the American Climatological Association and was published in the Transactions of that society. It developed the fact that there is a great inequality in the distribution of this disease throughout the state. There are seventy counties in Pennsylvania. Some of them are sparsely inhabited, are deeply wooded; the country is wild; the elevations range in the neighborhood of two thousand feet or over. The children "born and raised"

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