[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.159.129.152. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 27, 1892

THE DISEASE OF INEBRIETY IN ITS RELATION TO DISEASES OF THE MIND AND NERVOUS SYSTEM.

Author Affiliations

President New York Academy of Anthropology; Member New York Connty Medical Society; Brooklyn Pathological Society; Member Royal Asiatic Society of London; Gold Medallists Society, Science, Letters, and Art, of London; Medical Superintendent Sunny Side Sanitarium for Diseases of the Nervous System, Inebriety, and the Opium Habit, 128 Park Place, Brooklyn, N. Y.

JAMA. 1892;XVIII(9):250-257. doi:10.1001/jama.1892.02411130006001b
Abstract

Dipsomania is a form of physical disease, and it consists of an uncontrollable and intermittant impulse to take alcoholic stimulants, or any other stimulant or narcotic which causes intoxication. We must distinguish between this disease of the nervous system, which is one form of periodical insanity, and the physiological state in which the individual merely chances to indulge in liquor to excess. The great question of importance is to distinguish the two states or conditions when the result—intemperance—is the same. We must observe whether there are symptoms in our patient which can be referred to primary disease of the nervous system. We must examine for hereditary influences, which, when present, lead us, of course, to suspect disease. Early development of the appetite for stimulants points in the same direction; but the great diagnostic mark attending the disease is the irresistible impulse or craving, by which the patient is impelled to

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×