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Article
November 3, 1900

PHYSICIANS' INFLUENCE FELT.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(18):1160-1161. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.02460440034008

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Abstract

At the last session of the Iowa legislature, a certain prominent senator was notably the champion of osteopathy, and succeeded, in spite of opposition, in obtaining its legal recognition. His political ambitions have since expanded and he was recently a prominent candidate of his party for a congressional nomination. Notwithstanding the excellent prospects in his canvass he failed, and the cause of this, according to the Iowa Medical Journal, was the opposition of the medical profession, which was combined against him on account of his legislative record. Though in this case perhaps only the empty honor of a nomination was lost, it is satisfactory to know that one advocate of quackery had his aspirations quenched by medical influence, which might oftener be employed in this way for the public good. As the editor of the Iowa Medical Journal says: "The friends of the general practitioner are numbered by hundreds, yes

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