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Article
November 10, 1900

TUBERCULOSIS OF THE TESTICLE.WITH SPECIAL CONSIDERATION OF ITS CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(19):1187-1191. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24620450001001

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Abstract

Before entering into our subject, let us briefly review the anatomy and physiology of the testicle, that we may better understand the pathologic changes and processes of repair which take place when it is the seat of tubercular infection.

The testes are suspended in the scrotum by the two spermatic cords, the left being slightly lower than the right. Each is oval in form, compressed laterally, and occupies an oblique position in the scrotum, the upper extremity being directed forward and outward, and the lower downward and a little inward. The surface of the gland, excepting its posterior border, is free, smooth and covered by the visceral layer of the tunica vagiinalis. Lying along the posterior border is a narrow flattened body, the epididymis, which consists of three parts, namely, first, the upper enlarged extremity, globus major; second, the pointed lower extremity, globus minor, and, third, the intermediate portion, or

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