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Article
March 12, 1892

THE ANCIENT USE OF ANTISEPTICS.

Author Affiliations

OF KOCKVILLE, MD.

JAMA. 1892;XVIII(11):319. doi:10.1001/jama.1892.02411150009001d

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Abstract

During the meeting of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, held in Rockville last November, I called the attention of the members to page 98 of Bartholomew Parr's London Dictionary, reprinted in Philadelpha in 1819, where he says—calomel mixed with starch and strewed on a pledget of lint is perhaps the best application to the stump of an amputated limb, placing mercury in the same category with the knife and the ligature.

The starch, of course, was added to give bulk, so that a large surface might be covered without the risk of ptyalism. Parr also recommends pyroligneous acid in the treatment of wounds. I rarely use anything but calomel as an antiseptic and I defy any one to produce a better.

My uncle, the late Dr. John W. Anderson, of this town, sixty years ago invariably used either calomel or brown sugar in the treatment of wounds.

Antiseptics

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