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Article
November 10, 1900

THE PERMEABILITY OF THE INTESTINAL WALL TO BACTERIA.

JAMA. 1900;XXXV(19):1220-1221. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.02460450036009
Abstract

It would be expected a priori that both the cutaneous integument and its visceral analogue, the mucous membrane, are under conditions of health impassable by micro-organisms, and that they thus act as protective coverings against infection. This assumption does not, of course, preclude the possibility of invasion of the ducts of glandular structures opening on the surface, as the sweat-glands, the sebaceous glands, the hair-follicles, etc. It seems probable, however, that a portal for the entrance of bacteria may be afforded by lesions so insignificant as readily to escape detection, and from which the tissues under consideration are scarcely ever wholly free. This would perhaps explain the frequency with which the bacterium coli commune, the most constant parasite of the bowel, is found in the lesions of many abdominal morbid processes. Some experimental observations have been made which go to show that mechanical obstruction of the bowel will be followed

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