[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 23, 1898

HOLOCAIN HYDROCHLORID; SOME NOTES ON ITS USE IN OPHTHALMIC SURGERY.

Author Affiliations

Ex-Superintendent of the Illinois Asylum for Feeble-Minded Children; Member of American Medical Association, Brainard District Medical Society and McLean County Medical Society. BLOOMINGTON, ILL.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(17):981-982. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440690041002q

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

Up to the present time but little experiment has been made in the use of holocain in ophthalmic surgery. But from the clinical notes so far at hand, it would appear that it has some advantages and may prove to be a very useful drug in ophthalmic practice.

"Holocain is a synthetic substance having the composition of para-di-ethoxy-diphenyl-ethenyl-amidin, and the hydrochlorid has been used in a 1 per cent. solution as an anesthetic in ophthalmic practice, but on account of toxic properties is not recommended for hypodermic injection. Anesthesia is prompt and lasting, and is not accompanied by mydriasis or disturbances of the accommodation" (British Medical Journal).

Dr. Robert Brudenell Carter of London contributed an article to the Lancet of May 29, in which he called attention to a paper read before the Belgian Academy of Medicine March 27, 1897, by Dr. Deneffe of Ghent, whose observations in the use of

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×