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Article
April 30, 1898

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF THE DIFFERENT FORMS OF THE KLEBS-LOEFFLER BACILLUS.

Author Affiliations

ASSISTANT TO THE CHAIR OF PATHOLOGY, CHICAGO POLICLINIC, MEDICAL INSPECTOR CHICAGO HEALTH DEPARTMENT (ANTITOXIN STAFF). CHICAGO, ILL.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(18):1019-1020. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440700011001b
Abstract

It is not necessary for me to enter into a detailed description of the bacillus of diphtheria, history of its discovery, growth in different culture media etc.; a few remarks however especially in regard to its morphology will be required in order to present this paper properly. Fraenkel in his work on bacteriology describes the Klebs-Loeffler bacillus as a bacterium, resembling in many respects Fraenkel's diplococcus of pneumonia. According to him, their habitat is in the oldest part of the pseudo-membrane. They are little rods of moderate size, usually slightly bent, about as long as the tubercle bacillus but twice as broad, hence of a rather coarse appearance and usually with rounded ends. But the form of this micro-organism is exceedingly variable, and the differences are striking in appearance. The bacteria are sometimes seen enveloped in a more or less capacious glassy membrane; sometimes the contents separate into several pieces

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