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Article
April 30, 1898

A GLANCE AT SOME RELATIONS OF DENTISTRY TO GENERAL MEDICINE.

Author Affiliations

BOSTON. MASS.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(18):1042. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440700034001n

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Abstract

The average dentist not only fails to recognize many indications which call for systemic treatment, but fails to see his need of such recognition. He still jumbles medical terms. His practice is largely empirical. He sees in part, but acts as one comprehending all; he gives advice to his fellow practitioners more freely than he would if he knew more.

If a new drug is advertised he tries it a few times, and immediately writes an article on it. He treats all forms of pyorrhea by scraping the teeth, but the deposit continues to accumulate, and the scraping is repeated. He treats sensitive dentine by the application of obtundents, and never dreams of prophylaxis or the correction of the underlying cause.

The teeth under certain conditions decay with great rapidity, and extra dollars are received for extra plugs inserted. The teeth are stained and eroded, only to be met with

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