May 14, 1892

Monument to Prof. Gross.

JAMA. 1892;XVIII(20):624. doi:10.1001/jama.1892.02411240024005

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To the Editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association:  In looking over The Journal of May 7, page 598,I note that Dr. Lester, of David City, Neb., calls attention to a "delightful odor not unlike that of the tube-rose" which he observes after taking a dose of acetanilid. You state that it is "undoubtedly an idiosyncracy or a phenomenon having a limited range."I can confirm in my own case Dr. Lester's statements, having frequently noted the odor, and having called the attention of others to the fact, and have had them to confirm my discovery. I have, furthermore, frequently stated to other practitioners that I knew that antikamnia contained acetanilid because this peculiar odor developed after I had taken a dose. None of the other phenol derivatives showed this odor.Trenton, Tenn., May 7, 1892.

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