May 28, 1892


JAMA. 1892;XVIII(22):687-688. doi:10.1001/jama.1892.02411260029013

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Dr. Sutherland contributes a short but suggestive paper upon this subject in a recent number of the British Medical Journal.

Under the heading "Symptoms Due to the Presence of Uric Acid in the System" he says:

"The subjects of the diathesis are often easily recognized. They have keen precocious minds, and small restless bodies; they are excitable, nervous, bright and amusing at one time, and greatly depressed at another; they do not readily fall asleep at night, often talk in their sleep, and have a habit of awaking in the very early morning; and they are dainty feeders, with a taste for everything that is bad from a nutritious point of view. The children are often described by their parents as being very subject to colds, and a chill in some form or another is the usual precurser of an acute attack. Along with this, and acting possibly as the

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