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Article
May 7, 1898

THE FREQUENCY OF APOPLEXY AMONG THE HIGHER CLASSES WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR ITS PREVENTION AND ESCAPE FROM FATALITY.

Author Affiliations

VICE-PRESIDENT AMERICAN ACADEMY OF MEDICINE; CHAIRMAN SECTION ON STATE MEDICINE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION; MEMBER COMMITTEE ON REVISION OF THE UNITED STATES PHARMACOPEA, 1890. NEW YORK, N. Y.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(19):1083-1084. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440710015001c

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Abstract

It is rare that an animal dies of apoplexy, but man's days are frequently ended by this disease, coming upon him generally later than the age of 50. The contrast between the simple life of the animal and the complex one of the man is in favor of the former, so far as it relates to health. At the beginning, the young animal and the child are on the same natural footing, both are natures sweet and innocent children. Little by little the child grows away from dependence upon natural methods for its guide, substituting the artificial as life advances and ever becomes more complex. But the animal pursues an even tenor of regularity and simplicity, avoids the excesses and escapes the sad consequences of sickness, pain and premature death.

The beginning of disease is at that moment when the laws of health are first violated, and starts with infancy

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