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January 12, 1901

THE EDUCATION OF THE SENSE OF TOUCH IN FEEBLE-MINDED CHILDREN AND ITS CONNECTION WITH MANUAL AND INDUSTRIAL TRAINING.

Author Affiliations

Physician to the West End Hospital for Nervous Diseases, London; Formerly Medical Superintendent of Darenth Schools for Imbecile Children. DARTFORD, ENGLAND.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(2):106-108. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.52470020034001g
Abstract

Dr. Seguin long ago pointed out that the proper way to educate feeble-minded children was by education of the senses, and that the more thoroughly this education was conducted, the better would be the training which could be afterward given. On this occasion I intend to concern myself more especially with the sense of touch, only alluding to the sense of sight when it may be necessary to do so. Mr. Herbert Spencer has shown how by evolution and specialization the other senses, smell, hearing, sound and taste, could have sprung from touch, and how touch is a universal language into which the other senses which are special languages would have to be translated in order to be understood. Thus we know that the vibrations of ether which strike on the retina stimulate the fibers of the optic nerve, and these fibers, when excited, have the power of awakening the

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