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Article
January 19, 1901

SOME REMARKS ON THE PLANTAR REFLEX, WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE BABINSKI PHENOMENON.

Author Affiliations

Alienist and Neurologist to St. Luke's Hospital; Consulting Alienist and Neurologist to Arapahoe County Hospital, and Neurologist to the U. P., D. & R. G., and C. & S. Railroads. DENVER, COLO.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(3):179-183. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.52470030035001g
Abstract

Believing that the duty of the specialist in this association, working in a special line other than surgical, is to bring forward for discussion, observations and recent discoveries on mooted points that will aid the railroad surgeon and physician in the diagnosis of certain diseased conditions, I shall attempt to give the generally accepted views, of neurologists at least, on the value of the "Babinski sign," the pathological plantar reflex; or, better yet, slow extension of the great toe, with or without extension and separation of the other toes, as an aid in diagnosing disease in certain portions of the central nervous system.

My observations have been made on 830 cases, 380 in hospital and 450 in private and consulting work. Besides, 2550 cases taken from my old records, I have utilized for the purpose of determining the frequency of the plantar reflex in nervous diseases in general. I wish

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