[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 14, 1893

ORAL MANIFESTATIONS IN METALLIC POISONINGS.Read in the Section of Oral and Dental Surgery, at the Forty-third Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association, held at Detroit, Mich., June, 1892.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF OPERATIVE DENTISTRY AND DENTAL CHEMISTRY IN THE DENTAL DEPARTMENT OF THE CINCINNATI COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY, AND PROFESSOR OF ORAL SURGERY IN THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE SAME COLLEGE.

JAMA. 1893;XX(2):35-37. doi:10.1001/jama.1893.02420290009001c

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

Many metallic poisons which are non-corrosive in character show the limit of their exhibition in the human system by manifestations of some nature in the oral cavity. Some of the corrosive metallic poisons also show this limit in the mouth. This is especially the case with the escharotic corrosive metallic poisons. In both acute and chronic metallic poisonings are found oral manifestations; but this paper wishes to direct the attention to the oral manifestations arising from chronic metallic poisonings. There is a slight suspicion that the prolonged exhibition of arsenic, in proper doses to produce medicinal effects, may result in the death of the pulp of one or more of the teeth in the individual so treated. There is no authenticated case of this nature, but the theory of it, based upon a knowledge of the accumulative nature of arsenic, is a good one. Arsenic in its action has a

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×