[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.205.87.3. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 4, 1893

HIP DISEASE.

Author Affiliations

LECTURER ON ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY IN THE NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCHOOL; PROFESSOR OF ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY IN THE POST-GRADUATE MEDICAL SCHOOL, CHICAGO; SECRETARY OF THE AMERICAN ORTHOPEDIC ASSOCIATION; ATTENDING ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON TO ST. LUKE'S FREE HOSPITAL, CHICAGO,; HONORARY SURGEON ROYAL SOUTHERN HOSPITAL, LIVERPOOL; CORRESPONDING MEMBER AMERICAN ORTHOPEDIC ASSOCIATION.

JAMA. 1893;XX(9):226-237. doi:10.1001/jama.1893.02420360002001a

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

[Copyrighted by John Ridlon, M.D,]

Treatment:—It is the function of a normal hip joint to permit of motion in several directions and to sustain the weight of the body, both during walking and while standing at rest, without injury to its structure. When a joint becomes diseased these functions become restricted or abolished, motion is no longer possible, or possible to only a limited degree, and the joint refuses to sustain the superincumbent weight for any prolonged period.

If we study the clinical evidences presenting at a hip joint, as it passes from health to disease and back to health again, we find them to be somewhat as follows: all the muscles, whose functions it is to move the thigh on the pelvis, gradually become more and more rigid from invuluntary muscular spasm until all motion at the joint is abolished. The thigh becomes gradually flexed on the pelvis, and

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×