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February 16, 1901

THE RELATION OF MALARIA TO THE GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION OF THE MALARIA-BEARING MOSQUITO.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(7):450. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.02470070036013

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Abstract

Grassi asserts that the geographic distribution of the genus Anopheles, the mosquito of malaria, in Italy coincides with that of malaria. He thinks that a like coincidence will be found the world over. In the first number of the Journal of Hygiene, a new publication from Cambridge, England, founded for the purpose of the publishing in the English language of original work in hygiene, Nuttall, Cobbett and Strangeways-Pigg show quite clearly that Grassi's claim has no general application; for they have found Anopheles in many parts of England "where there is no record of malaria having previously existed, and where there is certainly no malaria to-day." Celli also has found Anopheles in healthy places in Italy in which there has never been malaria. The disappearance of malaria from Great Britain consequently does not depend upon the extinction of mosquitoes capable of harboring the parasites of malaria. The English investigators mentioned

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