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Article
March 9, 1901

SANITATION AND PROGRESS.

Author Affiliations

SURGEON-GENERAL, U. S. MARINE-HOSPITAL SERVICE. WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(10):609-614. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.52470100001001
Abstract

Some four years ago, at the meeting of this Congress in the City of Mexico, I had the honor of addressing you upon the subject of "International Responsibility with Regard to Epidemic Diseases." Quite in line with the thoughts then expressed, I have chosen for my subject to-night "Sanitation and Progress," and it will be my effort to show the interdependence of municipal, national, and international effort in the great undertaking of the elimination of contagious disease, and that the twentieth century should witness this achievement.

Each morning I open on my official desk a package of newspaper clippings, containing notices of the prevalence of the several contagious diseases throughout the whole United States; and, as I note the varying recurrence of smallpox, diphtheria, typhoid fever, and scarlet fever, the notes upon consumption, the alarms concerning yellow fever and the bubonic plague, the thought which is impressed upon me is

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