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Article
March 16, 1901

THE NATURE AND TREATMENT OF VERTIGO.

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK CITY.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(11):722-727. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.52470110024002f
Abstract

Among the various consequences of organic and functional disturbance of the nervous system with which we are called upon to deal, what is technically known as vertigo is surely one of the most common. Often insidious in its advent, obscure as to ultimate pathology, in its treatment baffling, it has come to be regarded as a most slippery adversary, a kind of ignis fatuus of the clinic, at the view of whose antics and illusive ways erudition and experience stand aghast.

Yet despite the unsatisfactory condition of present knowledge, there is no denying the eminent practical importance of the subject. Consider for a moment the amount of apprehension and annoyance caused by the symptom itself; then its frequency, as an accompaniment or sequence of the most disparate pathological conditions, and you will concede, I think, that a warrant is provided, sufficient to justify a careful sifting of available data, an

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