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March 16, 1901


JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(11):742-743. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.02470110044007

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A recent occurrence in an eastern medical college does not speak very highly for the maturity, manliness and scientific spirit of the undergraduates of the institution. A professional school is generally supposed to be free from some of the idiotic puerilities that have been so frequent in institutions for primary culture, and hazing, we had supposed, was being left in the remote past by men who had gone far enough to choose the profession of medicine. The student, however, in the college referred to, who was maltreated in a certainly unpleasant and mortifying way, and who brought his tormentors into a police court, has been ostracized, it is said, by the whole school, including his own class. The transaction does not reflect any special credit on these students.

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